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pesto recipes

How to Make Pesto With Basil or Leftover Greens - The Nickel Pincher

It's not just for basil! Eliminate food waste in your kitchen, and save money, by turning all sorts of greens into pesto.

By Jean Nick


Pesto sauce can be made from more than just basil

Whenever you're stuck buying huge bunches of herbs at the grocery store all winter, chances are you use the two or three tablespoons necessary for a single recipe and then leave the rest of the bunch to wilt in your refrigerator.

Waste no more! Any herb, or any of those other wilting greens in your produce drawer, can be turned in a pesto and preserved (pesto freezes really nicely) and used as a pasta topping or an appetizer spread the next time you need food in a hurry. And as the herbs and greens in your garden are harvested this spring, you can turn those into pestos you can enjoy all next winter.

At its most traditional, Italian pesto is made from fresh basil leaves, olive oil, Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, and raw pine nuts, all of which are ground to a smooth paste in a mortar and pestle (in fact, the word "pesto" comes from the verb "pestare," which means "to crush," as with a pestle). But with modern preparation methods (food processor!) and a little creativity, you can make pesto from just about any herb or green veggie, alone or in combinations, along with oil, some sort of nut, some sort of cheese, and garlic or some other seasoning. There's even a red pesto that gets its color from tomatoes or peppers.

Basic Green Pesto

2 cups fresh herb or veggie leaves, washed
¼ to ½ cup grated hard cheese, such as Parmesan or Romano
¼ to ½ cup raw or roasted nuts; pine nuts or walnuts are traditional, but just about any nut will work
3 cloves minced garlic
½ cup olive oil

Put everything except the oil in a food processor, turn it on, and slowly drizzle in the oil while it is running (you may need to scrape down the sides of the bowl with a silicone scraper once or twice). Blend until smooth or leave as chunky as you like. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Alternative Pestos

Once you get the basic pesto recipe down, get creative with your combinations. Start with whatever greens you have left over in your fridge: arugula, basil, spinach, broccoli rabe, parsley, cilantro, mint, garlic greens, or "scapes", wild ramps, mustard greens, lightly cooked asparagus, lightly cooked broccoli, green onions, braising mix, fennel, snow peas, lemon balm, Asian greens…well, you get the idea. If it’s green and yummy, you can make it into pesto. For a mellower pesto, pair stronger flavored greens like cilantro, garlic greens, or mustard greens with spinach or another mild vegetable (a 50/50 mix is good).

Below are a few of my favorite combinations.

Spring garlic pesto = half garlic greens, half spinach, and walnuts (but no garlic)

Parsley-chèvre pesto = Italian parsley, pine nuts, aged chèvre

Arugula almond = arugula, almonds, garlic, and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, plus the juice of half a lemon

Mint–green onion pesto = ¾ cup mint, ¼ cup green onions, 1 cup parsley, and garlic (but no cheese), plus ½ teaspoon grated organic lemon rind

Thai pesto = cilantro, Thai basil, garlic, sesame oil, and peanuts (but no cheese), plus a tablespoon of minced gingerroot, a tablespoon of lime juice, and hot pepper to taste

Parsley-walnut pesto = parsley, walnuts, garlic, and Romano cheese

You can turn any of the above into a red pesto by adding ½ cup of sundried tomatoes to the other ingredients in the food processor for a rich, tangy sauce. Roasted red pepper or grilled eggplant are also delicious additions, as are lightly cooked mushrooms.


Try this recipe for Kale-Almond Pesto from The Runner's World Cookbook!



Serve your finished pesto tossed with hot whole-grain pasta (mix a little hot water with the pesto to thin it for easy tossing), spread it on toasted rounds of good whole-grain bread, use dabs as a pizza topping, brush it on grilled meat or seafood, dilute to make a marinade, or include a bit in an omelet.

Pesto will keep two to three days in the refrigerator; for longer storage, freeze it in an ice cube tray and pop the frozen cubes into an airtight container. Drop a cube or two into soup for a flavor lift, or thaw and toss with hot pasta for a quick meal.

Farm gal, library worker, and all-around money-pincher Jean Nick shares advice for green thrifty living every week with Rodale News.

Filed Under: ORGANIC FOOD, RECIPES, THE NICKEL PINCHER

Published on: April 7, 2010



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saving pesto

I make mine in a blender, usually just basil and olive oil. Then freeze in icecube trays, moving the pesto to a freezer container once solid. Keeps really well, good size for individual servings (great for us singles!)

garlic scapes are great!

You just touched on my favourite pesto: garlic scapes! They'll be coming on in another month or so, and serious garlic farmers will often just give them away for the picking, since they remove them to promote growth of the bulb.

Cheese and nuts...

If dietary preferences or allergies are an issue feel free to leave out either nuts, cheese, or even both and maybe add a little more oil or other liquid. The end result will obviously be different, but still very tasty!

Everything pesto

I love this article. I never seem to have enough time for pesto making.
I have experimented with walnuts or pecans and also leftover cheddar instead of parmesan. I even tried Feta, which also works! But I never got a better idea how to replace the greens!

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