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What's Better, Local or Organic?

A panel at National Products Expo West explored what the term "locavore" actually means—and should mean.

By Leah Zerbe

tags: NATURAL PRODUCTS EXPO, ORGANIC FOOD



What's Better, Local or Organic?

They may be local, but that's not the end of the story.

RODALE NEWS, ANAHEIM, CA—Natural Products Expo West, the largest trade show in the country showcasing natural and organic food and products, kicked off in Anaheim Thursday with a focus on farms and locally grown food. Although the show features many healthy, ecofriendly nonedibles, such as reusable shopping bags and plastic-free water bottles, food is clearly a dominant theme of the show.


What went on at Natural Products Expo West? Check out Rodale.com's NPEW Blog for an inside look!

Philippe Cousteau, environmental activist and grandson of legendary explorer Jacques Cousteau, addressed the Organic Farming Research Foundation's "Think Spring!" luncheon. Also on Thursday, Mark Smallwood, executive director of the Rodale Institute, an experimental organic farm in Kutztown, Pennsylvania, participated in an Expo panel that discussed what the food-trendy term "locavore" really means, and the impact that label for locally grown has on organics. About 100 attendees sat in on the locavore session and joined the spirited conversation.

THE DETAILS: As the locavore and organic movements continue to grow in the United States, so do the numbers attending Natural Products Expo West. Organizers held the first show in 1981, where 3,000 members of the natural products industry combed through 234 booths. Compare that to last year's numbers, where 55,960 members (mostly buyers who decide what will show up on store shelves in the coming months) perused more than 3,000 booths. And organic is going global: In 2010, 97 countries were represented at Expo West.

WHAT IT MEANS: Businesses ranging from large corporations to small mom-and-pop start-ups from all over the world convene at Expo West in hopes of expanding into new markets. As organic goes global, though, consumers continue to consider their local food options. Smallwood's panel focused on the locavore movement, and how interest in locally grown food affects the rising interest in organic agriculture. Locavore means a lot of things to a lot of people. For some, it might entail eating only foods grown or raised within 100 miles of home. For others, it could mean buying whatever's at a local farmer's market, regardless of whether the food is sprayed with harmful chemicals or grown using organic methods. But trying to eat locally grown food raises questions. Should you support local farmers who grow meat or other goods for huge corporations, even if the methods involve harmful chemicals, antibiotics, and animal cruelty?

Published on: March 11, 2011
Updated on: March 14, 2011



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Really important questions -- so get detailed answers

This article raises really important questions but is too short to provide in-depth answers. I highly recommend the book ORGANIC OR NONORGANIC? (2007) by Cindy Burke, which gives extremely useful detailed information and recommendations about all of these issues, including a detailed shopping guide and a sort of math equation for deciding between local nonorganic and more distant organic. I found it in my public library and photocopied the crucial pages for future reference.

Marcellus Gas Drilling

Another good question to ask your farmer is "Do you have a gas lease?" (many do) or if his neighbors have a lease. If so, his/her water, soil, and air and therefore his produce, certified or not, can be contaminated with toxic chemicals from the hydraulic fracturing process or by the migration of "natural" contaminants, such as radium.

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