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clothesline and laundry

The Nickel Pincher: Clothesline 101

Save money, cut carbon emissions, and extend the life of your clothing—all with a few bucks’ worth of rope.

By Jean Nick


The Nickel Pincher: Clothesline 101

Stay on the line: Warmer weather means you can dry your clothes for free and lower your electric bill.

RODALE NEWS, EMMAUS, PA—Line drying is back! True, electric clothes dryers aren’t going to disappear anytime soon. But, as you may find simply by strolling around your neighborhood on the next sunny Saturday, it seems like more people than ever are returning to the tried-and-true combination of sun, wind, and clothesline to dry their clothing and linens. Earlier this year, the Los Angeles Times reported that the trend was becoming popular among celebrities, even as some ordinary folks had to battle with local home owner associations that banned the practice as “unattractive.” Hanging your laundry out to dry instead of firing up your dryer reduces your electric or gas bill, lowers carbon emissions, helps your clothing and linens last longer by eliminating some wear and tear on the fabric (saving you more money), is a great excuse to get outside, and gives your fabrics that natural, fresh outdoor smell (no need to use chemical fragrances that claim to mimic it). Even if you don’t hang every wash load, each time you do, you save yourself money and help protect the environment.

The Line
There are all sorts of drying line setups, but all you really need is a length of clean, strong rope that you can tie between two trees or poles. Having a tightening mechanism of some sort is a good idea, as every type of line I’ve used has stretched over time. You can buy tighteners at a hardware or home improvement store; they attach to the line and make it easy to take up any slack without having to untie and retie the rope. Be sure you hang your line high enough so heavy washed items won’t brush the ground. Pick a site where no one will run into the drying laundry and also consider how far you will need to carry your laundry. Avoid putting your line under trees that drip sap or where birds tend to perch. If you are short on space, you can buy a retractable clothesline, which attaches to a wall and lets you extend the line when needed, or an umbrella-style clothesline, which is like a patio umbrella but has clotheslines in place of umbrella fabric. These options require a bigger up-front investment, but you’ll recoup the costs.

The Clothespins
Once you have a line, you’ll need some clothespins to hold your wash on it. I prefer the spring clip type, and I’m partial to the wooden kind. Buy the sturdiest ones you can find—in my experience, the cheap ones lose their grip in even the lightest breeze and fall apart easily. Keep your pins in a portable bag or other container that you can hang on the line while pinning up your laundry. But store the bag inside when not in service; if your pins are left outside, they will get dirty and may stain your wash. Plus they won’t last as long. You can make a very serviceable clothespin container out of a stiff plastic milk or water jug: Cut off the bottom of the handle to make a hanging hook and cut away some of the jug’s top for easy access to your clothespins inside.

Hang ’em high!
If you want to speed up the drying process, you can run your laundry through an extra spin cycle in your washer. (When I have plenty of drying time, I actually prefer to reduce the spin time and let the clothes hang outside longer, to save even more electricity.) When your laundry’s been spun, grab your clothespins and tote your wash out to the line. Give each item a good snap to minimize wrinkles and attach it firmly to the line with the pins. I like to gently stretch collars, the strips down the front of buttoned shirts, and seams that are prone to shrinking, pulling them to their normal lengths before I hang them. But be careful not to overstretch anything. Fold the top edge of each item of clothing over the clothesline and clip the fold to the line. Clothing dries fastest if it’s hung a single layer, with nothing folded in half over itself. If space is limited, you can scrunch things closer together; it will all just take a little longer to dry. Hang small, thin items like dress socks together in pairs to save on pins and space and overlap the corners of larger items so one pin can hold both. On windy days, use extra clips to make sure everything’s especially secure.

Filed Under: HEALTHY HOME, LAUNDRY, THE NICKEL PINCHER

Published on: April 30, 2009



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Bastante interessante. Mas

Bastante interessante. Mas nem tudo neste artigo como esse, mas ainda que todos são grandes. Obrigado. Bem-vindo ao nosso site estará contente de vê-lo jogos cassino

indoor line drying

I have been hanging many of my clothes on a metal clothes rack with wheel casters IN MY SUNNY KITCHEN! It seems to work quite well. I also use a folding wooden clothes dryer (the old-fashioned kind with wooden dowels) for drying sweaters. It saves time and my energy of having to go up and down stairs to my garage, checking to make sure various items are not being over-dried (or under-dried). A sunny window is the best (facing South or West), as clothes dry well in the winter, too.

DRYING PANTS AND JEANS

REGARDING DRYING PANTS AND JEANS: USE WOODEN TROUSER HANGERS (TWO SHORT OR LONG WOODEN SLATS) THAT "CLAMP" TOGETHER. HANG THE JEANS UPSIDE DOWN USING THESE HANGERS. I OFTEN USE TWO HANGERS (ONE FOR EACH PANT LEG) IF THE FABRIC IS TOO THICK TO FIT BOTH LEG EDGES INTO ONE HANGER. THIS WORKS QUITE WELL FOR ME AND KEEPS THE PANT LEG HEM EVEN, WITHOUT CLOTHESPIN MARKS.

Line drying in the desert

I looked forward to line drying my clothes when we moved to the desert.... but.... after several weeks of my sheets, towels and clothes smelling like "dirt" I gave up and went back to the dryer. We live in an area that has a lot of wind.. thus blowing dirt in the air. Even when the wind is not blowing... there are no lawns... no green leaved plants... for the clothes to absorb that "fresh" outdoors smell from. My loss....

Clean washline

For those who haven't hung their laundry before, I recommend taking a damp rag or papertowel along the washline (up and back) to remove any dirt before hanging your wash. It saves the clothes from getting dirty. You'll be surprised how dirty the line gets. As a child, we always hung our wash out-there's nothing like that fresh scent and crisp feel!

Good clothespins

While no pin is totally wind-proof some are better than others. "HOMZ" Super Grip pins (http://www.mariasfarmcountrykitchen.com/country-store-nickel-pincher/) are pretty strong. Be sure to fold the edge of the garment over the line and clip over the fold with the pin, as the friction of the folded fabric adds considerably to the chances of the item holding tight. On really windy days I would use two pins per leg for a pair of jeans. When my drying line was on the fourth floor roof of a building in Boston I never used fewer than two pins per item, as it was often windy and anything that went over the edge would have been gone forever.

line drying heavy wet jeans

I have not been able to find good, sturdy, spring-type clothespins that will hold its load in a breeze. Can you recommend a company that sells strong clothespins?

Good for you!

So we should add that air drying clothes inside during the heating season not only saves energy and money, it also has health benefits! Thanks for the comments and keep up the eco-work!

line drying clothes

I found some saw horses in the small field between my house and the empty house next door. I use them in the basement to dry my sheets, blankets, and towels. Instead of using a fan, I open two basement windows to create a cross breeze. Even opening one window brings in a breeze; maybe because the old-fashioned windows swing open from the bottom vs sliding open. Anyways, these heavy items dry quicker than the clothes I bring upstairs to put on the drying rack. An added benefit I found was that my skin isn't so dry now and my frizzy hair is gone because of the added moisture in the house.

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